World Field Epidemiology Day

We have exciting news to share: In 2021, the world will celebrate its very first World Field Epidemiology Day, and we are counting on you to make it a success.

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, we are reminded more than ever before of the invaluable skills that field epidemiologists bring to preventing, detecting and investigating outbreaks. In recognition, TEPHINET, the global network of Field Epidemiology Training Programs (FETPs), will be leading the development of a globally coordinated campaign to raise awareness of field epidemiology through the launch and promotion of World Field Epidemiology Day.

This event is much bigger than our own network of FETPs and regional FETP networks. We will call upon on the broader universe of ALL stakeholders and partners worldwide who are engaged with field epidemiology to participate—all public health agencies, university departments, NGOs, ministries of health, and others whose work relies on field epidemiologists are called upon to engage in this campaign (as are the individuals working as field epidemiologists and those who support them!).

Together, we can make a strong case for increased support and investment in field epidemiology for the health of the world.

What’s Next?

We are seeking input to shape key messaging for advocacy—as well as input on the date for World Field Epidemiology Day.

TEPHINET is launching an 8-week open input period to gather public feedback on key messaging for the World Field Epidemiology Day campaign. We want to know: WHY is field epidemiology important? Why does it deserve more attention and increased investment?

Send us your best arguments before July 1, 2020 and encourage your colleagues to do the same. Feel free to share articles and other data that support the argument that field epidemiology is a vitally important discipline. In addition, we would like to hear any thoughts you may have on the date for World Field Epidemiology Day. TEPHINET proposes September 7, 2021.

Why September 7? On this date in 1854, John Snow took his findings from his now-famous investigation of the Broad Street cholera outbreak to local officials, leading them to take action and remove the handle of the offending water pump.

Click here to provide your input!

After the close of this public input period, we will continue to keep you informed about how you and your institutions can participate in commemorating this special day.

In the meantime, if you have any questions, please direct them to:

Tina Rezvani
Communications Manager, TEPHINET
Campaign Coordinator - World Field Epidemiology Day
trezvani [at] tephinet [dot] org

We are incredibly excited to embark on the journey toward the first World Field Epidemiology Day with you! Keep an eye out for further news from us, including the announcement of the official date, campaign website, and other information.