Beta-lactam Resistance Phenotypes of Enterobacteria strains isolated in Urinary Tract Infections at Sylvanus Olympio Teaching Hospital - Lomé, Togo, 2018

  • Anti-microbial resistance
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Background:
The Sylvanus Olympio Teaching Hospital realise several antibiograms and antibiotic resistance cases are detected but available data are underanalyzed. Our objective is to describe the profile of beta-lactam resistance of enter- obacteria isolated in urinary tract infections at the Sylvanus Olympio Teaching Hospital.
Methods:
We conducted a descriptive study on antibiogram Results: obtained in 2014 from enterobacterial strains. The antibi- ogram was performed on Mueller-Hinton agar medium by the disk diffusion method according to EUCAST recom- mendations. We determined different phenotypes by antibiogram interpretation.
Results:
In 2014, out of 1072 urine samples analyzed, 171 (16%) were positive to bacteriological culture. Enterobacteria represented 91.81% of the isolates with Escherichia coli (71.97%), Klebsiella pneumoniae 22.30%, Proteus spp 3.18% and Enterobacter spp 2.55%. Escherichia coli strains presented 85.84% of the beta-lactam resistance phenotypes as following: 36.10% extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL), 25.77% high-level cephalosporinase, 13, 40% low level Penicillinase, 10.30% high level Penicillinase, 9.28% low level cephalosporinase and 5.15% TRI Penicillinase inhibitors-resistant. Klebsiella pneumoniae strains presented 80% beta-lactam resistance phenotypes as following: 67.86% ESBL, 17.86% high level cephalosporinase, 10.71% TRI Penicillinase inhibitors-resistant, 3, 57% of low level cephalosporinase.
Conclusion
ESBL phenotype was predominant among two species Escherichia coli
and Klebsiella pneumoniae found in urinary tract infections. We recommend wide dissemination of these Results: to Sylvanus Olympio Teaching Hospital prescribers for a better management of urinary tract infections cases in Lomé. It is important to set up an antibiotics and antibiotic therapy management committee within the Hospital.

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